Welcome to the online home of Soluspirin

clicks logo dis-chem logo alphapharm logo

History

The effects of aspirin-like substances have been known since the ancient Greeks recorded the use of the willow bark as a fever fighter. The leaves and bark of the willow tree...

read more

Consumer

Use aspirin exactly as directed on the label, or as it has been prescribed by your doctor. Do not use the medication in larger or smaller amounts, or use it for longer than recommended...

read more

Students

Like most medicines aspirin tablets contain more than just aspirin, this is to help in the tablet formation process and also to aid performance when the patient uses it. Most tablets will...

read more

History

The effects of aspirin-like substances have been known since the ancient Greeks recorded the use of the willow bark as a fever fighter. The leaves and bark of the willow tree contain a substance called Salicin, a naturally occurring compound similar to acetylsalicylic acid, the chemical name for aspirin.

Many people are curious about who invented aspirin. While no one person invented aspirin, the origin of aspirin as we know it came about through research. Aspirin discovery was actually the result of the work of several aspirin inventors. In 1897, a German chemist with Friedrich Bayer and Company was searching for a treatment for his father's arthritis pain and produced the first stable form of a product introduced as Aspirin. By 1899, The Bayer Company was providing aspirin to physicians to give to their patients.

Consumer

Use aspirin exactly as directed on the label, or as it has been prescribed by your doctor. Do not use the medication in larger or smaller amounts, or use it for longer than recommended.

Take this medication with a full glass of water. Taking aspirin with food or milk can lessen stomach upset. Enteric-coated aspirin is specially formulated to be gentle on your stomach, but you may take it with food or milk if desired. Do not crush, chew, break, or open an enteric-coated or extended-release pill. Swallow the pill whole. The enteric-coated pill has a special coating to protect your stomach. Breaking the pill could damage this coating. The extended-release tablet is specially made to release medicine slowly in the body. Breaking this pill would cause too much of the drug to be released at one time.

The chewable tablet form of aspirin must be chewed before swallowing.

Keep the orally disintegrating tablet in its package until you are ready to take the medicine. Open the package and peel the back cover from the tablet. Using dry hands, place the tablet into your mouth. It will begin to dissolve right away, without water. Do not swallow the tablet whole. Allow it to dissolve in your mouth without chewing.

If you need to have any type of surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are taking aspirin. You may need to stop using the medicine for a short time.

Do not take this medication if you smell a strong vinegar odor in the aspirin bottle. The medicine may no longer be effective. Store aspirin at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

Students

Like most medicines aspirin tablets contain more than just aspirin, this is to help in the tablet formation process and also to aid performance when the patient uses it. Most tablets will include materials to help the powder flow during manufacture e.g. talc, something to lubricate the powders during the compression process e.g. food waxes or salts of fatty acids, a disintegrant to ensure the tablet falls to pieces once it is in water or in the stomach e.g. starch, and a bulking/compression aid which is a material making the tablet a reasonable size to handle and to help the powders from which the tablet is made hold together after they have been compressed. Other ingredients may include flavours and sweeteners to improve taste – which is important for tablets that disperse in the mouth or are dissolved in water before use. Dispersible and soluble tablets also usually include agents to make them effervesce, this is usually a weak acid such as citric and a bicarbonate or carbonate salt.

A major consideration in formulating tablets is the chemistry of the active ingredient and aspirin is no exception. In fact aspirin presents many challenges to the formulator – although it has some good points as well!

Unlike most drug materials, aspirin is excellent at making tablets. Tablets are formed by mixing the powders of the formula together (i.e. aspirin and some of the components mentioned above). These are fed into a tablet press where a dose of powder is fed into a tablet shaped die and then compressed together between two punches at high pressure. For materials such as aspirin, the structure of the crystals is such that they can deform and form bonds between each other without the need for any additional binders.

The other ingredients that go with the aspirin have to be selected with care as it is prone to hydrolysis, breaking down into acetic acid and salicylic acid (try smelling some very old tablets – they may smell of vinegar due to the release of acetic acid). This hydrolysis reaction occurs more quickly in the presence of water and so materials with low moisture content may be selected – this is why you never see an aspirin liquid mixture! The hydrolysis reaction can also be promoted by the presence of alkali materials and so effervescent agents and lubricants need to be selected carefully.

More information can be found at: aspirin-foundation